Did the last woolly mammoths had disastrous DNA?

Category: ANCIENT WORLD

Asked on 2020-02-20 14:46:03

Question viewed : #205

The answer

Pendulum World wrote on 20th of February 2020
Yes, they did.

 

Pendulum World wrote on 15th of March 2020
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Woolly_mammoth

 

Useful links on topic - More information - Source

https://www.reuters.com/article/us-science-mammoths/the-bitter-end-last-woolly-mammoths-plagued-by-genetic-defects-idUSKBN20200I

 

The story

The woolly mammoth (Mammuthus primigenius) is an extinct species of mammoth that lived during the Pleistocene until its extinction in the early Holocene epoch. It was one of the last in a line of mammoth species, beginning with Mammuthus subplanifrons in the early Pliocene. The woolly mammoth diverged from the steppe mammoth about 400,000 years ago in East Asia. Its closest extant relative is the Asian elephant. The appearance and behaviour of this species are among the best studied of any prehistoric animal because of the discovery of frozen carcasses in Siberia and Alaska, as well as skeletons, teeth, stomach contents, dung, and depiction from life in prehistoric cave paintings. Mammoth remains had long been known in Asia before they became known to Europeans in the 17th century. The origin of these remains was long a matter of debate, and often explained as being remains of legendary creatures. The mammoth was identified as an extinct species of elephant by Georges Cuvier in 1796.

 

source text and image : https://en.wikipedia.org (*) Lines marked in red are not the truth.

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